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Monthly Archives: December 2017

Type ‘A’ Blood Affect Gains

1. BLEND & CONSUME FRESH VEGGIES IN BETWEEN MEALS

Being a hard gainer means placing a high priority on simple and complex carbohydrates (carbs) for the sake of ATP, insulin levels, etc. The majority of the immune system is located in the digestive tract–very little can access the bloodstream without first accessing the intestinal tract. So in order to offset taxing your already sensitive intestinal tract with complex and simple carbs, blend and consume substantial amounts of vegetables in between your biggest meals. Not only will this be beneficial to your blood type once the nutrients from the vegetables enter your bloodstream, but the texture of the vegetables acts as a brush along the lining of your intestinal tract, cleaning as it moves along.

2. ONLY SPIKE INSULIN LEVELS WHEN YOU’RE SURE IT WILL BE UTILIZED QUICKLY

Sugar has an adverse effect on the immune system, but the insulin spike from sugar ensures that the hard gainer’s muscle can grow in the presence of the nutrient it needs (fat). Therefore, it is imperative to know the times of the day your body can handle insulin the best.

Your body can naturally handle insulin once you wake up in the morning. The 6-8 hour fast you entered into upon going to sleep causes those that aren’t even hard gainers to enter into a hyper-catabolic phase. Of course, as the day goes by, your body won’t be able to handle insulin as efficiently as the morning hours but you can usually force it proceeding a workout. Keep your highest sugar intake around these times and you’ll ensure that your immune system remains optimal.

Foods A Breastfeeding Mother

  • Green Vegetables And Seasonal Fruits: Green leafy vegetables and fruits both may offer plenty of nutrients and are rich in Vitamin, Calcium and other minerals. Including them in your regular serving may ensure the supply of all the nutrients and vitamins to your baby and helps you stay healthy and fit. Also, it increases the production of milk in your body.
  • Nuts And Seeds: These are a rich source of protein and fiber and many other minerals and vitamins as well, and if you are a vegan, so, you should add it to your diet. It not only satisfies your hunger pangs, but also ensures the good health of your baby.
  • Water: Water is important to turn everything you eat into milk. Drinking enough quality as per your body need may ensure the proper supply of milk to your baby, which helps to keep them healthy. Just because water is important, doesn’t mean you need to over drink, have it when you feel thirsty. Not only water, you can have unsweetened and non-caffeinated beverages.

Foods To Avoid –

  • Caffeine: For every mother to be or a breastfeeding mother coffee is a big no. You shouldn’t have it as it may keep your child irritated and never let them sleep properly, which is not good for their health. Coffee or any other source of caffeine like chocolate must not be in your diet until the time you are breastfeeding the baby.
  • Peppermint: Almost every one of us loves peppermint and for sure use it in regular meals, but having it when you are breastfeeding is not advisable because it reduces your milk supply.

About Childhood Allergy Insights

Antibiotics and Vitamin D Deficiency Can Lead to Childhood Food Allergies

Thankfully, from time to time, medical research makes some breakthroughs to provide insights into what can be done to reduce the allergy potential. Two such occurrences have recently been reported through the American Academy of Pediatrics. The first established that increased use of antibiotics in the first year of a child’s life leads to higher incidence of food allergies. This is thought to occur because the antibiotics disrupt the bacteria (good as well as the bad) that are growing and forming a functional relationship in the child’s gut. Disturbing the balance allows for food allergies to gain a foothold.

The second insight is that a vitamin D deficiency can also set the stage for food allergies. An extensive study in Australia (a country with high child food allergy rates and extensive vitamin D deficiencies) has demonstrated a strong correlation between vitamin D deficiency and the propensity for food allergies. These study results suggest, then, that vitamin D sufficiency is a real protective factor in preventing food allergies in the first year of a child’s life.

The vitamin D deficiency issue is one more easily solved. Have your pediatrician check your child’s vitamin D level. It’s done through a simple blood test. Any deficiency can be corrected with medication. A vitamin D deficiency is not uncommon. We take vitamin D supplements on doctor’s orders every day. Vitamin D is important for many reasons, so don’t overlook this simple test. Avoiding a food allergy will make life much more pleasant for your child and much easier for you.

The antibiotics question is another issue altogether. If the medical situation warrants and your pediatrician says your baby needs an antibiotic, so be it. We have antibiotics to be used when they are needed. On the other hand, don’t try to talk the doctor into administering an antibiotic when it is not needed. This only builds resistance to the drug and disturbs the bacteria counts in the baby’s system.

Avoid Food Poisoning

Milk and milk products: Milk bought from your friendly neighbourhood with his unhygienic storage and selling practices, is a very good medium for bacterial growth. Pasteurised milk is free of this risk, but is only available in the bigger cities. So, every milk dish should be served hot or kept in the refrigerator until served. This also applies to cream and cheese.

Curd is generally prepared by mixing a small amount of old curd into fresh, lukewarm milk; this provides an excellent culture medium for bacteria as it supplies nourishment as well as a favourable temperature. And, since the process is repeated daily, the bacteria present in the old sample are carried forward to the next day’s curd and so on. Sometimes curd is made by mixing chopped vegetables into it. If, in this process, the pH (acid: alkali balance) of curd rises above 5, harmful organisms may multiply on storage.

Ice-creams: no doubt, milk used in ice-creams made by a reputed company gets sterilized when it is boiled. But, contamination can occur when it is cooled and flavours and additives added. Bacteria introduced at this stage are not likely to be killed; when the milk is frozen, these become dormant. They then become active again when the temperature rises during transportation or at the time of serving or eating.

Eggs: The shells of eggs may be contaminated with the faeces of the birds that laid them. Under certain conditions of temperature and humidity, these germs can penetrate the shell – quite a common occurrence with ducks eggs. Fortunately, ducks eggs are not commonly eaten.

Rice: Spores of important food-poisoning bacteria contaminate rice and these spores survive cooking temperatures. So, if rice is not to be eaten immediately after it’s prepared, it should be stored in a refrigerator.

Sliced bread and confectionery: as these foodstuffs are generally stored for extended periods in a warm environment – during sale. Transport and at home – they are more likely to harbour harmful germs and provide a conducive medium for their multiplication.

Cold sweets: Cold sweets like custards are suitable media for bacterial growth. They can be contaminated by flies, insects, repeated handling during preparation and sale and long storage at atmospheric temperature (for example, on the occasion of festivals).

LOW-RISK FOODS

The foods less likely to cause food poisoning are:

Salted or Sugar concentrated foods: The high concentrations of salt (in salted meats, anchovies, olives etc.) or sugars (in jams, syrups, and honey) dissolve in water to form concentrated solutions, leaving insufficient moisture for bacterial growth.

Fatty foods: Butter, cooking oil, fatty fish etc.

Acid foods: Pickles, citrus fruits etc.

Dry foods: Cereals and pulses. Properly stored, they do not support bacterial growth in the dry state, but once prepared, they are very good media for bacterial multiplication, and should therefore be stored in a refrigerator.

Canned foods: Unless the can is leaking or is bulging (due to gas produced inside the container), these foods are safe. After they are opened, they must be treated as fresh foods, and similar rules of handling and storage followed.